The Wonderful Habits of Rabbits
Julia's House for Lost Creatures

More Than Enough: A Passover Story

by April Halprin Wayland
illustrated by Katie Kath

We were delighted to receive a copy of More Than Enough: A Passover Story for review, and from the first reading we were struck by the joyfulness of the story. We firmly believe any picture book can be a starting point for young readers to make new discoveries, but even adults can learn something new in this story. More Than Enough is presented in a way that readers who are not familiar with the traditions of Passover will gain an understanding of this spring holiday. 

"Deriving its name from the Passover seder song Dayenu which means, 'it would have been enough,' a Jewish family prepares their Passover seder, giving thanks for their everyday blessings. First the family visits the famers market for walnuts, lilacs, and honey (adopting a kitten along the way!). Than at Nana's house the children complete a treasure hunt of holiday traditions: chopping apples for charoset, opening the door for Elijah singing the verses of 'Chad Gadya,' and searching from the hidden afikomen. All the while, Dayenu remains the thankful refrain."

"The infectious, child-appealing watercolor artwork–with that adorable kitten!–will make readers smile. And once they understand the meaning of dayenu, they'll get into the spirit of gratitude as well." –Booklist

"Chopping apples for charoset – Dayenu.
Dashing though puddles on the way to Nan's house – Dayenu.
A delicious seder meal for the whole family to enjoy – Dayenu."

 

In this Issue

Charoset

Charoset recipe for kids inspired by More Than Enough by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath - offtheshelfblog.com

 The perfect recipe to make after reading More Than Enough? Kid-friendly charoset, the dish that the family in the book brings to their Passover Seder. Before reading this book we were unfamiliar with charoset, but after some research discovered the many variations. We decided on a very basic and child-friendly recipe, filled with apples, sunflower seeds (instead of nuts), cinnamon and grape juice (in place of wine), but feel free to change your recipe by chopping the mixture more finely or swapping in or adding chopped pears, dried fruit, walnuts or another nut, or honey. 

We learned from More Than Enough that charoset symbolizes "the mortar Jewish slaves used when they built structures for the Egyptians." 

Charoset

Ingredients

  • 4 apples - we used gala
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds or chopped nuts
  • 1/2 cup grape juice
  1. Peel and core the apples and chop, by hand or in the food processor, into bite-sized or smaller pieces. Place the apple pieces in a bowl for mixing.
  2. Add the sunflower seeds, grape juice and cinnamon and stir until combined. Cover and refrigerate the charoset until ready to eat. Enjoy!

 

Dayenu

"Dayenu" is repeated throughout More Than Enough as the family expresses the joy of their celebrations. The word comes from a traditional song and "is a reminder to be aware of and grateful for the blessings in each moment." Hear the song and sing along with this video!

 

Make it Rain: Nature Rain Paintings

Nature Rain Painting activity inspired by More Than Enough by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath - offtheshelfblog.com

Nature Rain Painting activity inspired by More Than Enough by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath - offtheshelfblog.com

Spring rain showers can be such a fun event and are featured throughout the story as the family prepares for their Passover celebration. Not even rain can dampen the festive spirit of holiday preparations.

Nature Rain Painting activity inspired by More Than Enough by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath - offtheshelfblog.com

We took our inspiration for this week's art activity from the spring showers. We collected nature's spring treasures and experimented with making "rain" paintings, using the treasures as our paintbrushes. We had so much fun experimenting with this that we developed a few variations you might want to try. Explore and enjoy!

One more note: this activity is best to do outside!

Nature Rain Paintings

Supplies

  • Leaves, blooms, twigs, etc, whatever captures the imagination of your young reader
  • Watercolor paper or cardstock
  • Food coloring
  • Cups for "paint"
  • Water
  1. Go on a nature walk to collect "paintbrushes." 
  2. Mix water and drops of food coloring in the cups. 
  3. Set out paper (we placed ours on a jelly roll pan to contain the drips and drops). 
  4. Dip a brush in the food coloring "paint" and shake over the paper to make drops of colored rain. Experiment with the different brushes you have collected. Which makes large drops? Which makes a shower of drops? Try different colors to see how the colors mix on the paper. 

Variations

  • Crayon Resist: Try drawing on your paper with crayons before adding drops of rain. 
  • Fizzing Rain: Try mixing the food coloring with vinegar instead of water. After "making puddles of rain" on the paper with the vinegar mixture, try sprinkling with baking soda. 
  • Try combining the crayon resist and fizzing rain variations in one project!

Nature Rain Painting activity inspired by More Than Enough by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath - offtheshelfblog.com

  • Try placing a large leaf over your paper before you begin to sprinkle "rain" on the paper. Carefully remove the leaf to reveal the image left behind.

Nature Rain Painting activity inspired by More Than Enough by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath - offtheshelfblog.com

 

More from Off the Shelf

One Year Ago: Rechenka's Eggs

Two Years Ago: Big Bear's Big Boat

Three Years Ago: A Home for Bird

Four Years Ago: The Easter Egg

 

How are you celebrating Passover or enjoying More Than Enough: A Passover Story? Let us know in the comments or on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Tag your Instagram photos with #booksofftheshelf so we can see what you have been up to!

 We were provided with a copy of this book for review, but all opinions are our own.
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